Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Where On (Google) Earth #181

Looks like I get to host the next episode of Where On Google Earth! Wo(G)E #180 over at Clastic Detritus turned out to be a tricky rotated image of the Farasan Banks, a huge coral reef complex off the coasts of Saudi Arabia and Yemen in the Red Sea. I don't know much about them beyond what I could dig up from a Jacques Cousteau quote:
"The wildest of all the reef complexes in the Red Sea … 350 miles long and thirty miles wide …. This demented masterpiece of outcrops, shoals, foaming reefs, and other lurking ship-breakers was created by societies of minute animals that have changed the aspect of our planet far more than man has yet been able to do."
Anyone out there a coral reef expert? At any rate, I'm sure you're all waiting for the next challenge. Here it is:



Click to zoom. No altitude or direction on this one, but hopefully there are enough clues for you to track it down. To win the round, you need to post the correct latitude and longitude in the comments below, along with a little commentary about what geological feature you're looking at. The winner gets to host the next round, or choose the location and ask someone else to host it if they're not a blogger.

To give any newcomers a head start on this one, I'll invoke the Schott Rule- you have to wait one hour after the post time to answer for each WoGE round you've one in the past. Good luck!

PS - If you want to see where Wo(G)E has gone in the past (and who's won it), take a look at Ron Schott's compilation in KMZ format!

10 comments:

Dr. Jerque said...

18 10 25 S; 69 09 04.5 W
Volcan Parinacota, Chile / Bolivia Border

Dr. Jerque said...

oh yeah---and Laguna de Cotacotani which appears to sit in a large landslide complex.

annejefferson said...

At S 18.2 W 69.2 you've got the Laguna de Cotacotani on west side of image and Parinacota volcano on east side of image. The volcano is a stratovolcano which produced a massive debris avalanche about 8000 years ago, which is responsible for some of the hummocky topography you see in and around the Laguna. According to the font of all knowledge (i.e., Wikipedia), this debris avalanche is not the source of ponding for the lake, which may have originated as kettle holes following glaciation. In any case, the lake receives surface water inputs from two streams and groundwater influx as well.

Tuff Cookie said...

Wow, that's got to be a record. You're up for the next one! Just post a link in the comments when you get the chance.

annejefferson said...

Grr, Dr. Jerque's comment appeared from moderation while I waited out my Schott rule. I totally had that one nailed.

Tuff Cookie said...

You've both got it! Want to share the next round, or would you like to cede posting rights to Dr. Jerque, Anne?

Silver Fox said...

I was just going to say "it looked familiar" and start searching the Cascades - but I don't have time to post a WOGE. Congrats Kyle!

Silver Fox said...

Dear Tuff: win it back! :)

Ron Schott said...

Have you got a new one in the oven, Kyle?

BrianR said...

I think Kyle said he was going out to do field work ... I guess we'll have to wait